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Suwa Award Honours T2K Team

February 25, 2014

The J-PARC Neutrino Beam Group, which includes the Canadian T2K collaborators, has been honoured with the 2013 Suwa Award in recognition of their contribution to the development of high-energy accelerator science. The award celebrated the J-PARC Neutrino Beam Group's successful production of the world’s highest-intensity neutrino beam, used in the T2K experiment.

 

T2K Publishes Electron Neutrino Appearance

February 13, 2014

A new electron neutrino appearance result from the T2K collaboration was published this week, bringing researchers one step closer to answering one of the greatest puzzles of particle physics: why is there more matter than antimatter in our universe?

 

Canadians Help International Team Catch Neutrinos “In the Act”

July 19, 2013

The T2K collaboration confirmed a definitive observation of a new type of neutrino oscillation, in which muon neutrinos transform to electron neutrinos. It has been known that neutrinos transform from one kind into another, but this particular transition had never before been conclusively observed. This announcement builds on previous experiments, for which Physics World awarded "Top 10 Breakthroughs" in 2011 (see below). 

 

T2K Experiment Honoured in France

November 26, 2012

The T2K collaboration was selected for high honours by the French magazine La Recherche.  The physics paper, titled "Indication of Electron Neutrino Appearance from an Accelerator-produced Off-axis Muon Neutrino Beam," was awarded Le Prix la Recherche by the prestigious, French magazine.  This prize celebrates the physics accomplishment (concerning the behavior of mysterious, subatomic neutrinos) and the clear, precise language of the paper.

 

Physics World reveals its top 10 breakthroughs for 2011 "Catching the flavour of a neutrino oscillation"

December 16, 2011

The international team of physicists working on the T2K experiment in Japan were awarded for being one of the top ten breakthroughs in 2011. The researchers fired a beam of muon neutrinos 300 km underground to a detector, where they found that six neutrinos had changed, or "oscillated", into electron neutrinos. While the measurement is not good enough to claim the discovery of the muon-to-electron neutrino oscillation, it is the best evidence yet that one "flavour" of neutrino can oscillate into another.