Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics Laboratoire national canadien pour la recherche en physique nucléaire et en physique des particules

Upping the Anti

05 June 2011

Canadian researchers instrumental in game-changing antimatter study

(Vancouver, BC) – Science fiction is fast approaching science fact as researchers are progressing rapidly toward “bottling” antimatter.  In a paper published online today by the journal Nature Physics, the ALPHA experiment at CERN, including key Canadian contributors, reports that it has succeeded in storing antimatter atoms for over 16 minutes.  While carrying around bottled antimatter like in the movie Angels and Demons remains fundamentally far-fetched, storing antimatter for long periods of time opens up new vistas for scientists struggling to understand this elusive substance.  ALPHA managed to store twice the antihydrogen (the antimatter partner to normal hydrogen) 5,000 times longer than the previous best, setting the stage, for example, to test whether antihydrogen and normal hydrogen fall the same way due to gravity.

Lead author Makoto Fujiwara, TRIUMF research scientist, University of Calgary adjunct professor, and spokesperson of the Canadian part of the ALPHA team said, “We know we have confined antihydrogen atoms for at least for 1,000 seconds.  That’s almost as long as one period in hockey!  This is potentially a game changer in antimatter research.”

Antimatter remains one of the biggest mysteries of science.  At the Big Bang, matter and antimatter should have been produced equally, but since they destroy each other upon contact, eventually nothing should have remained but pure energy (light).  However, all observations suggest that only the antimatter has vanished.  To figure out what happened to “the lost half of the universe,” scientists are eager to determine if, as predicted, the laws of physics are the same for both matter and antimatter.  ALPHA uses an analogue of a very