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Saturday Morning Lectures

Venture to the frontiers of modern physics with the Fall 2022 season of the Saturday Morning Lectures, proudly presented by TRIUMF, UBC, and SFU

The Fall 2022 SML series will feature topics like how we're using neutrinos to learn more about the universe to the latest developments and future of the James Webb Space Telescope.

Register for Fall 2022 Saturday Morning Lecture free tickets on Eventbrite here!

Note that tickets are not required to attend but registration is appreciated!

Schedule:


Saturday Morning Lectures #1 

October 15, 2022, 10:00 AM PST

Location: University of British Columbia, Earth Sciences Building (ESB) 2012

Ryley Hill (UBC): Studying galaxies in the early Universe with the James Webb Space Telescope 

Galaxies fill the Universe, yet we still do not fully understand how they evolved from loose collections of stars and gas 13 billion years ago into the beautiful diversity of spirals and ellipticals that we see today. In this talk, we will explore how we can now use the James Webb Space Telescope to see what galaxies looked like in the early Universe, and what we are learning about how these galaxies grew and evolved over cosmic time. 

Dr. Hoi-Kwan (Kero) Lau (SFU): What should we care about quantum technologies?  

Quantum, the property of fundamental particles, has been making its appearance outside the textbook recently. You might have seen the mentions of “quantum technology” in the news, social media, or modern culture – and it’s usually associated with nearly magical performance. In this lecture, we'll provide a scientific overview of quantum technologies, starting by introducing the properties of quantum that are radically distinct from everyday objects.  


Saturday Morning Lectures #2 

November 5, 2022, 10:00 AM PST

Location: Simon Fraser University, Surrey Central Campus, Room 2740 

Matthias Danninger (SFU): From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe and back to the Coast of British Columbia 

What is a neutrino? What can we learn from neutrinos about the Universe? Dr. Matthias Danninger from the SFU Department of Physics will discuss answers to these questions and how British Columbia could play a dominant role for neutrino astronomy in the future. 

Monika Stachura (TRIUMF): Little-known ways to apply nuclear physics to chemistry and medicine 

Learn about TRIUMF’s role in producing, studying, and applying isotopes of various chemical elements to understand their role in health and in disease. Delve into the little-known medical applications of nuclear physics techniques and discover how an interdisciplinary approach can help us trace the origins of different diseases, as well as synergistic endeavours to design and develop more efficient (radio)pharmaceuticals. 


Saturday Morning Lectures #3 

November 19, 2022, 10:00 AM PST

Location: University of British Columbia, Earth Sciences Building (ESB) 2012 

Matthias Danninger (SFU): From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe and back to the Coast of British Columbia 

Monika Stachura (TRIUMF): Little-known ways to apply nuclear physics to chemistry and medicine 


Saturday Morning Lectures #4 

December 3, 2022, 10:00 AM PST

Location: Simon Fraser University, Surrey Central Campus, Room 2740 

Ryley Hill (UBC): Studying galaxies in the early Universe with the James Webb Space Telescope 

Daniel Higginbottom: Building the Quantum Internet 

Quantum processors have advanced rapidly and state-of-the-art devices now outperform classical supercomputers at specific contrived problems. However, practical quantum advantage to solve problems in chemistry, materials engineering, optimization and drug discovery may lie beyond such chip-scale devices. Networking modular quantum processors is a path to quantum computing at scale, but network interconnects are a daunting challenge for many leading quantum computers. Silicon colour centres are a new quantum computing platform, developed by the Simmons Silicon Quantum Technology lab at SFU and Photonic Inc., with a native optical network interface that can be integrated on-chip and networked with existing telecommunications infrastructure to form a large scale ‘quantum internet’. In this talk Dr Daniel Higginbottom will explain the basic principles behind the quantum internet and how their device will make it happen 


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